Soundproofing your ceiling Part II | Soundproofing with Dave

2.03.2006

Soundproofing your ceiling Part II


You can find Part I here.

Part II of Soundproofing your ceiling. First some information on structure noise from the Specifications Construction Institute, Noisy Neighbors, and the Institute for Research in Construction.

1. Use Resilient Channel and Acoustical Mat (Mass Loaded Vinyl). This usually requires that you have open studs. So if you already have an existing ceiling in place this may not be your best choice. More information on this type of soundproofing can be found at the following websites: SuperSoundProofing Company, soundproofing America, Netwell Noise Control, and the New York Times.

2. Your going use Sound Clips/Isolation Mounts and in most cases they will connect to flurring channels. There are several of these types of clips on the market: Aero-Support, Super Sound Clip, and Springers and Hangers. More information on this subject can be found here: SoundProofing America, and SoundClips Vs. Resilient Channels.

3. Soundproofing an existing ceiling with mass loaded vinyl. You will want to attach
flurring strips to the existing ceiling and attach the MLV to the strips as outlined here: Mass Loaded Vinyl Installation.

4. Soundproofing an existing ceiling with mass loaded vinyl backed with foam. More info on this procedure can be found here: Decoupled Mass Loaded Vinyl for walls and ceilings.

5. The most interesting and promising method of soundproofing your ceiling is using Audio Alloy's Green Glue. Green Glue is a viscoelastic dampening material, basically it can absorb noise and vibration. See my other posts about Green Glue and download the Pratt School of eEngineering's test of QuietRock which also incorporates an viscoleastic dampening material. You can use Green Glue for existing or new ceilings. Audio Alloy says that Green Glue is excellent product for absorbing low frequency noise. Since footfall/impact noise is low frequency it seems to me this would be the product to use on your ceiling. I think that adding two layers of drywall with two layers of Green Glue would be an effective way to soundproof your ceiling and it would reduce impact/footfall noise. This method also requires less labor and is less expensive. For some additional thoughts on Green Glue go here: Green Glue SoundProofing, Green Glue Results Coming Soon, Structural Dampening for SoundProofing, and check out the Green Glue thread at AVS Forum sign-up required.

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